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By J. Eric Thompson, George E. Stuart

A Catalog of Maya Hieroglyphs (Civilization of the yankee Indian)

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A Catalog of Maya Hieroglyphs

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Jack Gibb, clerk at the Hudson's Bay Company's Big Trout Lake post. A native of Aberdeen, Scotland, Gibb made the most of life in the Canadian wilderness, as attested to by this twenty-pound lake trout he has just caught. 60 Hudson Bay Watershed Chief James Masakayash raises the flag as a signal to members of the Osnaburgh Band to come to the council house for the spring trappers' meeting. Cam Currie (in peaked cap), trapline management supervisor for the Department of Lands and Forests, consulting a map with Big Trout Lake trappers.

He also had to submit an estimate of the number, if any, of other quota animals Oynx, marten, and fisher) in his territory. In the 1950s, beaver, mink, muskrat, and otter were the mainstay of the northern Ontario fur industry. Red and Arctic fox, weasel, red squirrel, wolf, and black bear were also taken but in much smaller numbers. The most valuable in terms of demand and money was the lynx, whose pelts provided a bonanza for the lucky trapper. Marten were found only in isolated pockets and seemed on the verge of extinction (in 1949-50 fewer than a dozen were taken by trappers in all of the northwestern one-third of Ontario), but they were to rebound dramatically in following decades.

The officers' chief objective in these meetings with the native trappers was to collect data on the previous winter's fur harvest and to urge conservation practices. Every trapper was required to fill out a form detailing his catch, and the head trapper on each trapline had to prepare a map showing active beaver lodges. He also had to submit an estimate of the number, if any, of other quota animals Oynx, marten, and fisher) in his territory. In the 1950s, beaver, mink, muskrat, and otter were the mainstay of the northern Ontario fur industry.

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A Catalog of Maya Hieroglyphs by J. Eric Thompson, George E. Stuart


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